Image Gallery


Penetration of petiole fed 10 mM DTT in a Clematis leaf after 2 h, showing NPQ (blue < 0.2, gold > 1.0) developed after 120 s in strong light. (see Osmond and Park in Omasa et al. (2002) Air pollution and biotechnology, Springer Verlag, Tokyo, pp.309-319.)
Penetration of petiole fed 10 mM DTT in a Clematis leaf after 2 h, showing NPQ (blue < 0.2, gold > 1.0) developed after 120 s in strong light. (see Osmond and Park in Omasa et al. (2002) Air pollution and biotechnology, Springer Verlag, Tokyo, pp.309-319.) Click the image above to view an enlarged image

Penetration of petiole fed 1 µM DCMU in a Clematis leaf shown by quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (gold 0, red 70%) after 30 s illumination. (see Osmond and Park in Omasa et al. (2002) Air pollution and biotechnology, Springer Verlag, Tokyo, pp.309-319.)
Penetration of petiole fed 1 µM DCMU in a Clematis leaf shown by quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (gold 0, red 70%) after 30 s illumination. (see Osmond and Park in Omasa et al. (2002) Air pollution and biotechnology, Springer Verlag, Tokyo, pp.309-319.)

Very slow penetration of petiole fed 50 µM nigericin beyond vascular parenchyma cells in a Clematis leaf after 2 h shown by chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (red 0, green 50%) after 120 s illumination. (see Osmond and Park in Omasa et al. (2002) Air pollution and biotechnology, Springer Verlag, Tokyo, pp.309-319.)
Very slow penetration of petiole fed 50 µM nigericin beyond vascular parenchyma cells in a Clematis leaf after 2 h shown by chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (red 0, green 50%) after 120 s illumination. (see Osmond and Park in Omasa et al. (2002) Air pollution and biotechnology, Springer Verlag, Tokyo, pp.309-319.)

Opuntia engelmanii waiting for a summer storm in the Sonoran Desert, Arizona. (photo by Barry Osmond; see Nobel and Bobich (2002) Ann. Bot. 90, 593-598.)
Opuntia engelmanii waiting for a summer storm in the Sonoran Desert, Arizona. (photo by Barry Osmond; see Nobel and Bobich (2002) Ann. Bot. 90, 593-598.)

Strong photosystem II fluororescence from grana (yellow) in outer mesophyll cell chloroplasts of Sorghum and weak photosystem I fluorescence (red) from inner bundelsheath cell chloroplasts. (confocal micrograph by Brian Gunning; see Edwards et al. (2001) Plant Physiol. 125 46-49.)
Strong photosystem II fluororescence from grana (yellow) in outer mesophyll cell chloroplasts of Sorghum and weak photosystem I fluorescence (red) from inner bundelsheath cell chloroplasts. (confocal micrograph by Brian Gunning; see Edwards et al. (2001) Plant Physiol. 125 46-49.) Click the image above to view an enlarged image

Norway Spruce (Picea abies) in controlled environment chambers at Flakaliden (64.12 N 19.45 E), 60 km west of Umea, Sweden. (photo courtesy Sune Linder sune.linder@ess.slu.se; see Stockfors and Linder (1998) Tree Physiol. 18, 155-166 )
Norway Spruce (Picea abies) in controlled environment chambers at Flakaliden (64.12 N 19.45 E), 60 km west of Umea, Sweden. (photo courtesy Sune Linder sune.linder@ess.slu.se. see Stockfors and Linder (1998) Tree Physiol. 18, 155-166 )

Like many other plants, inner canopy leaves of Inga sapindoides Willd. in the Humid Tropics Biome of the Eden ProjectCornwall, UK.contain high levels of the α-xanthophyll lutein epoxide(Lx)that co-locates with violaxanthin in the antenna pigment protein complexes (Matsubara et al 2005, J Exp Bot 56, 461-468). Tolerant of disturbed acid soils, these rapidly growing tree legumes from Central America are often used to shade coffee plantations but the roles of Lx remain an enigma. (Photo by C. Büchen-Osmond).
Like many other plants, inner canopy leaves of Inga sapindoides Willd (in the Humid Tropics Biome of the Eden Project, Cornwall, UK) contain high levels of the α-xanthophyll lutein epoxide (Lx) that co-locates with violaxanthin in the antenna pigment protein complexes (Matsubara et al 2005, J Exp Bot 56, 461-468).
Tolerant of disturbed acid soils, these rapidly growing tree legumes from Central America are often used to shade coffee plantations but the roles of Lx remain an enigma. (Photo by C. Büchen-Osmond). Click the image above to view an enlarged image

Space filling model of hexadecameric Rubisco (side view) with large subunits in blue and green and small subunits in yellow. (Image Inger Andersson).
Space filling model of hexadecameric Rubisco (side view) with large subunits in blue and green and small subunits in yellow. (Image Inger Andersson). Click the image above to view an enlarged image

Ribbon model of hexadecameric Rubisco (side view) with large subunits in blue and green and small subunits in yellow. The substrate RuBP is shown in red. (Image Inger Andersson).
Ribbon model of hexadecameric Rubisco (side view) with large subunits in blue and green and small subunits in yellow. The substrate RuBP is shown in red. (Image Inger Andersson). Click the image above to view an enlarged image


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